The Department of History

College of Arts & Sciences


Undergraduate Courses

The following course descriptions are based on those that appear in the history section of the Undergraduate Course Catalog. Not all courses are offered every semester.

Most History courses are writing-emphasis; see the UTK Undergraduate Catalog for more information. Schedule is exactly as appears above and on MyUTK, but not all course descriptions are included here.

*Requires departmental permission to register. See instructor for details.

History 222: US History II, 1877 – Present Dr. Olsson

History 241: Western Civilization I, Ancient World – 1715
Dr. Rutenberg
Historical survey of the civilization of the western world to 1715.

History 241: Western Civilization I, Ancient World – 1715
Dr. Pardue
Historical survey of the civilization of the western world to 1715.

History 241: Western Civilization I, Ancient World – 1715
Mr. Durbin
Historical survey of the civilization of the western world to 1715.

History 242: Western Civilization II, 1715 – Present
Dr. Andersen
This course explores the history of Europe and Europe’s interactions with the outside world from 1715 to the present day. Topics include the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, the world wars, and the Cold War. In addition to providing an overview of the major events in European history during this period, the course will focus on analyzing how and why such developments took place. We will therefore discuss, among other things, the major driving forces behind these historical transformations and try to determine what accounted for Europe’s particular path to modernity.

History 242: Western Civilization II, 1715 – Present
Dr. Hardy
Historical survey of the civilization of the western world from 1715 to the present.

History 242: Western Civilization II, 1715 – Present
Dr. Stephens
Historical survey of the civilization of the western world from 1715 to the present.

History 247: Western Civilization I, Ancient World – 1715
Dr. Rutenberg
Historical survey of the civilization of the western world to 1715. Students will attend the appropriate 241 lectures and the designated honors discussion section. Writing-emphasis course.

History 256: Latin American History II, Late 19th Century – Present
Dr. Jefferson
This course provides an introduction to the principal economic, political and social transformations in Latin America from the Wars of Independence to the present. The course will explore a variety of topics, including colonial legacies, emergence of nation-states, land use and labor organization, political movements, populism, revolution, US-Latin American relations, military regimes, and contemporary social movements. These and other issues will be addressed in lectures, readings, and films/documentaries. In addition to the lecture, students will be required to attend a weekly discussion session.
Same as Latin American Studies 252.

History 261: World Civilization I, Origins – 1500
Dr. Sanft

Historical survey of world civilization to 1500.

History 261: World Civilization I, Origins – 1500
Dr. Minnema

Historical survey of world civilization to 1500.

History 262: World Civilization II, 1500 – Present
Dr. Coker
Historical survey of world civilization, 1500 to the present.

History 262: World Civilization II, 1500 – Present
Dr. Jerviss
Historical survey of world civilization, 1500 to the present.

History 262: World Civilization II, 1500 – Present
Mr. Glaze
Historical survey of world civilization, 1500 to the present.

*History 307: Honors Research Methods
Dr. Freeberg
This course introduces students to the philosophy of history, theories of historical analysis, and the principles and techniques of historical research. The course is mandatory for history majors intending to write a senior honors thesis. Prerequisite: Consent of the department honors coordinator.

History 313: Medieval History 1100-1400
Dr. Gomez
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a basic framework and understanding of the European Middle Ages, roughly between the years 1000-1500. We will seek to avoid the traditional evolutionary view that sees the later Middle Ages as a launching pad for the Renaissance and Reformation, and instead try to understand the period on its own terms and merits. We will work to challenge and complicate other narratives as well, especially those which portray the period as a sort of “Dark Ages”. Instead, we will focus on the great cultural and intellectual vitality that created the beautiful cathedrals of Europe, the university, and the dynamic, fascinating interaction between the Christian and Islamic worlds. The course will be approached from interdisciplinary points of view, including philosophy, religion, art, literature, and both social and political history. We will also adhere to a broad cultural focus, studying not only the realms of Christian Europe, but also the larger Mediterranean world that included the Greek Byzantine Empire and the lands of Islam as well.

History 314: Renaissance Europe
Dr. Bast
This course will cover the politics, economic development, social life, art, literature and religious developments of the Italian Renaissance of the 14th and 15th centuries. We will also examine contemporary perspectives on the nature and meaning of the era, and the recent controversies surrounding the very conception of the “renaissance.” Instruction will consist of lectures, discussion and film.

History 325: Women in American History
Dr. Schurr
This course is a survey of American women’s history from the point of contact between Native Americans and Europeans through the present. Using various primary and secondary sources, we will learn about the changes and continuities in women’s lives over time and space. Also, we will move beyond the traditional (white, middle-class) focus of women’s history and explore the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups with a particular focus on the lives of African-American women.

Lectures and readings are organized thematically within a roughly chronological framework. Please note that this is a very work-intensive, yet hopefully rewarding, upper-division history course. Students should expect to spend approximately six to seven hours each week, outside of class, reviewing notes and preparing for discussions, papers, and the two exams. Same as Women’s Studies 325.

History 344: History of Brazil
Dr. Elrick
This course is a survey of Brazilian civilization from the fifteenth century to the present. The objective of the course is to provide the student with an understanding and appreciation of the mixture of Portuguese, Amerindian, and African cultures that took shape in Brazil during the five centuries after the arrival of Europeans in 1500. The first third of the course focuses on the implantation of colonial institutions in Brazil from 1500 to 1800, the rise of plantation society, slavery, and the Amerindian and African responses to colonization. The middle portion of the class concentrates on imperial Brazil, emphasizing the rise of the coffee economy, the demise of slavery, and the emergence of a “modern” Brazil in the nineteenth century. The last third of the course examines Brazil over the last century with an emphasis on political development, social inequities, culture, and the pursuit of economic growth. Same as Latin American and Caribbean Studies 344.

History 349: U.S. Military History 1754-Present
Capt. Mariner
This course examines American military history from the Seven Years’ War to the Iraq War, including the current “war” on terror and homeland security. In addition to studying major U.S. conflicts and declared wars, we will explore the development of distinctive American military tradition from classical republican roots to today’s Total Force. Special emphasis will be placed on civil-military relations, examining the U.S. Constitution on national defense matters as well as the evolving relationship between military service, citizenship, and the role of the professional armed forces in peace and war. In addition to reading about the experiences of average combatants, we will study the armed forces’ impact on American society, national security organization, defense spending, and technology. Same as Military Science and Leadership 349.

History 351: The American Revolution, 1763-1789
Dr. Schurr
This class is designed to provide students with an introduction to the events and issues surrounding the American Revolution. The subject of the course is not limited to the American Revolutionary War, but embraces the entire Era of the American Revolution—meaning the years and events before, during, and after the War for Independence itself. This period is a most important one because it marks the beginning of the United States of America, the transformation of the British Empire, and the beginning of what would come to be known of as the Age of Revolutions.

Our subject matter will be diverse and wide-ranging. This course will examine the origins of the American Revolution, both the administration of the British Empire through the mid-1770s and the factors that led the leaders of British North America to declare independence; the politics, warfare, and diplomacy brought about by that decision; and the political, cultural, and economic changes that occurred in the aftermath of the achievement of American independence in 1783. We will also take care to go beyond the political, diplomatic, and military history of the American Revolution, and examine the experiences of women, Native Americans, and African Americans during the Revolutionary Era.

Lectures and readings are organized thematically within a roughly chronological framework. Please note that this is a very work-intensive, yet hopefully rewarding, upper-division history course. Students should expect to spend approximately six to seven hours each week, outside of class, reviewing notes and preparing for discussions, papers, and tests.

History 352: Early American Republic
Dr. Coker
This course will explore the most significant political, economic, social, and cultural developments that occurred in the United States between the years 1800 and 1860. The young American republic faced both foreign and domestic challenges during this period. After the War of 1812, many white Americans were optimistic as they contemplated the country’s future, even concluding that they were specially favored by God for some great purpose. Yet even as the United States expanded, Americans debated–and eventually divided–over questions of what type of society America should be. To examine these themes, we will read and discuss primary sources representing a variety of perspectives, including politicians, immigrants, explorers, entrepreneurs, reformers, slaves, Indians, and more. Course requirements will include frequent short writing assignments, exams, and a group research project.

History 353: Civil War and Reconstruction Eras, 1860-1877
Dr. Harlow
The American Civil War cost more than 700,000 soldiers and civilians their lives. The war was the bloodiest in the nation’s history, and it left a lingering impact long after the fighting ceased. A transformational period in American history, not only did the sectional conflict preserve the national union, but it also brought the death of American slavery, which included the emancipation of four million enslaved African Americans. This course examines the origins of the sectional crisis, studies the war itself, explores the period of Reconstruction, and assesses the aftermath and legacy of the Civil War.

History 354: United States, 1877-1933
Dr. Hutton
This course will be a survey of American history between the waning days of Reconstruction and the onset of

the Great Depression. The course begins with the heady days of the “Gilded Age,” and the subsequent attempts to rein in its excesses, attempts that are collectively referred to as Progressivism. The Civil War’s irascible legacy, and the enforcement of political and economic white supremacy in the South and elsewhere, will also be explored. So too will what Teddy Roosevelt called the “New Nationalism” and its impact on American foreign policy in the 1900s and 1910s. We end with the paradoxical 1920s, perhaps one of our more misunderstood decades, and the cross-currents of what became known as the “American Century.”

History 355: United States, 1933-Present
Dr. Rutenberg
History 355 will explore the history of the New Deal and its legacy from the Roosevelt presidency through the post-Cold War era. The class will analyze the accomplishments as well as the challenges of domestic and foreign policy from FDR to Barack Obama. In addition to a close study of monographs and primary works, students will utilize the archival materials at the Howard Baker Center for a short research paper.

History 364: U.S. Constitutional History, 1877-Present
Dr. Mercer
This course will trace the constitutional development of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present. Topics will include the questions presented by immigration and imperial expansion, the rise of substantive due process, the New Deal Court, civil liberties during war, and the evolution toward judicially protected individual rights.

We will read several court opinions as well as four historical monographs. This is a writing intensive course and your grade is determined by several papers as well as by your attendance and participation.

History 373: Comparative Constitutional History
Dr. Mercer
This course will follow the development of constitutional government from a global perspective. To that end, we will examine the ways that different societies have tackled major constitutional issues and will focus on questions such as the difference between constitutions and constitutionalism, the sovereignty spectrum from judicial review to popular constitutionalism, and the often very thorny question of citizenship. We will also study the major comparative methodological techniques to try to better understand the contingencies that underlie the creation of a particular constitutional order.

History 380: African-American Experience, Civil War to the Present
Dr. Fleming
The end of the Civil War brought with it the end of slavery. Of course, this meant that the legal status of African Americans changed dramatically. Despite that change, however, the discrimination and oppression that had affected African Americans as slaves continued to haunt them as free people. During the course of this semester, we will examine the various methods that American of African descent have used in an effort to combat that discrimination and oppression as they see to exercise their rights as American citizens. Our examination will lead us from the bright hopes of the Reconstruction era through the dark days of the late nineteenth century, to the first global conflict of the century – World War I, into the Great Depression, to the second global conflict of the twentieth century – World War II, and finally to the Civil Rights Movement and the modern period.

History 395: The Crusades and Medieval Christian-Muslim Relations
Dr. Gomez
This course will examine the phenomenon of the Crusades in the Middle Ages, and its effects on the political, economic, and social histories of Europe and the Islamic World. While we will discuss the actual, traditionally numbered (i.e. First, Second, etc.) military campaigns, this class will largely focus on the social, cultural, and intellectual aspects of Christian-Muslim relations in the medieval period. Helping students develop a thorough understanding of the conflicts and coexistence of the great religious traditions in the Mediterranean world is the main goal of the class. Same as Judaic Studies 395.

*History 408: Honors Senior Paper
Dr. Andersen
Organization and writing of the senior honors thesis. Required of students working for honors in history. Prerequisite: History 407. Credit Restriction: Grade of A or B required for honors credit.

History 429: Medieval Intellectual History
Dr. Gillis
Medieval Intellectuals examines key medieval thinkers and their works in their historical context from the late Roman period to the late Middle Ages. A wide range of intellectuals, texts and ideas are explored in order to see the complexity and diversity of medieval intellectual life. The course format is a mixture of lecture and discussion. Writing emphasis course.

History 436: Love and Marriage: Gender and Sexuality in U.S. History
Dr. Sacco
This course will survey the history of sexuality and romantic relations in U.S. history. We will look at how men and women have understood and acted on their sexual and emotional desires, and the ways in which changing social constraints and opportunities affect the ways in which individual Americans have shaped their choices for a meaningful personal life. We will also study how and why these choices sometimes became political issues. Topics will include the histories of: contraception and abortion; courtship and dating; marriage and divorce; and heterosexuality and homosexuality. This will be a discussion-based course. We will read primary and secondary sources, thinking about how the history of sexuality and gender can help us to understand American history and society .

History 469: Religions of the African Diaspora
Dr. Elrick
This is an advanced-level course on the history of the Religions of the African Diaspora, some of the better known of which are Santería, Candomblé, and Vodun. We will take a broad, trans-regional approach to our study of the African Diasporic religions, first examining their origins in West Africa and West Central Africa. We will then examine the transplantation and development of African religions in five Atlantic cultural zones in the New World: the French, the British, the Dutch, the Spanish, and the Portuguese. Students will be expected to write and present a substantial (10-page) research paper on one of the African Diasporic religions.

History 479: History of Appalachia
Dr. Hutton
A class about Appalachia taught in Appalachia, and one that treats Appalachia not only as a place (and one with rather fuzzy boundaries at that) but also as a series of ideas that intermingle fact and fiction in wonderful and terrible ways. We start with the earliest Euro-American encounters with this continent’s eastern mountain range, and said range’s incorporation into an American republic- with all the voting, slavery and raising of cattle that entails. Things really get rolling after the American Civil War when this place is recognized as a distinctive region, a peculiar American problem and, eventually, the source of amazing legends. After that, Appalachia became a place to make fortunes from, a place to somehow “fix” or both. This course is an opportunity to examine a misunderstood segment of American history and to write some history of your own as well.

History 479: American Biography and the 1960s
Dr. Winford
This is a topics course that examines the United States during what many observers have described as the tumultuous decade of the 1960s. We will specifically rely on biography as our primary means of historical inquiry—using individual narratives about obscure and well known historical figures to help shed light on the most significant political and social conflicts that defined this period. Beginning with the Second World War and its aftermath, the course also seeks to understand how the country’s subsequent position as a superpower, alongside the Soviet Union, shaped its foreign and domestic policies. In the postwar struggle to promote democratic and capitalist principles over communistic threats throughout the world, the U.S. also had to confront its own injustices largely based on issues of race, class, and gender. Thus, primary emphasis will be placed on politics, social movements, and cultural rebellions of the 1960s. Some topics will include, but are not limited to, race riots, anti-war protests, new art forms, Great Society legislation, the rise of neo-conservatism, empowerment movements by people of color, Cold War brinksmanship in Cuba, and the escalation of ground and air wars in Vietnam. The readings will hopefully challenge, clarify, and assess our previously held assumptions about the 1960s in America. The course will also be student-centered, which means that significant time and space will be set aside inside the classroom for discussions, formal and informal writing assignments, and collaborative learning.

History 485: Explorers and Exploration in World History
Dr. Liulevicius
This course examines the global history of exploration from the earliest times to the present. Throughout history, one of the deepest human impulses has been the drive to explore, to encounter and know the unknown. In this

course we trace the greatest explorers of the world and spotlight their complex motivations, including religious seeking, commerce, conquest, and scientific knowledge. We follow the ancient Polynesian navigators as they spanned the vast Pacific Ocean, the Chinese Buddhist monk Xuanzang in his famous “voyage to the West” from 629 in search of holy scriptures, Viking arrival in Vinland in North America in 1001, Venetian merchant Marco Polo’s 1271 trek along the Silk Road to China, and the Arab scholar Ibn Battuta’s travels in the 1300s. We will examine Christopher Columbus sailing across the Atlantic to reach Asia (and in the process unleashing the decisive Columbian Exchange), Magellan’s 1519 circling of the globe, Captain Cook mapping the seas in the 1760s, Lewis and Clark charting the West with the guide Sacagawea in 1804, Sir Henry Stanley seeking Dr. Livingstone in Africa, and many others. We consider the dangerous, sometimes fatal, explorations of the North Pole and Antarctica, the ocean depths, and outer space as the final frontier. For an ironic perspective, we also examine a satire of discovery from 1726, Swift’s classic Gulliver’s Travels. Overall, we will see how explorers have bound the world together.

**History 490: Internship: Center for the Study of War and Society
Dr. Liulevicius
A structured field work experience in public history at a research center documenting modern U.S. military history, including special projects such as grant writing, interviewing, and archival processing. Prerequisite: Consent of the Director of the Center for the Study of War and Society.

*499 Senior Seminars are required for all majors who enrolled under Fall 2009 catalog or later, except history honors students. You do not have to be a classified senior to enroll, but at least 15 hours of History courses are encouraged pre-enrollment.*

History 499: American Civil War Era
Dr. Harlow
This course explores core debates in American history before, during, and after the Civil War. Topics will include the slavery debates, the political crisis of the Union, the meaning of the war, civil and voting rights, and the making of the modern American state. While exploring these issues in the secondary historical literature, students will also develop their own research interest in the period. Several writing assignments will lead to a final research paper.

History 499: The Emergent Empire: The Qin and Han Dynasties
Dr. Sanft
The creation of the first empire in China took place in multiple fields of activity, no one of which had sole responsibility for the outcome. Students in this class will learn about the political thought, religious observances, ritual forms, legal systems, social practices, and significant events in the period when the Chinese empire was coming into being for the first time, roughly from the late third century BCE into the early first century CE. As the culmination of this capstone course, each student will use primary and secondary sources, in translation when necessary, to write a major historical paper on a topic related to that of the class.

History 499: Twentieth Century South Africa: Segregation, Apartheid, and Democracy
Dr. Higgs
Until the release of political prisoners in 1990 and the final abolition of apartheid in 1994, the modern South African state captured the world’s attention in large part because it appeared as a shocking anachronism on the world stage—a country where a small privileged white minority ruled an oppressed and disenfranchised black majority. Strategically positioned and rich in mineral wealth, South Africa boasts one of the largest economies on the African continent. Our goal in this course will be to discover how a racially divided South African state evolved at the beginning of the twentieth century, why its leaders embraced an extreme segregationist model— apartheid—in the mid-twentieth century, and how the new multi-racial state has sought to cope with the country’s history.


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